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Publications

Mauricio Gatti: In the Jungle There Is Much to Do

En la selva hay mucho por hacer [In the Jungle There Is Much to Do] is the story of a group of animals trapped by a hunter and locked up in the city zoo. Missing their little ones and their jungle home they begin to plot their escape. It is an anarchist fable and a coloring book for all ages. Mauricio Gatti, imprisoned in 1971 for his activities as a member of an anarchist resistance movement in Uruguay, initially produced these drawings and lines of verse as letters to his then three-year-old daughter Paula—to communicate why he was behind bars, separated from her. Applying anarchist pedagogic principles, the combination of text and images offers a portrayal of the injustice of prison that engages sensitive young humans on their own terms. These materials were compiled into a book and published by the anarchist commune Comunidad del Sur in 1971, after Gatti’s release. Making an English translation of Mauricio Gatti’s work available for the first time, the book is part of a series of publications produced by the 11th Berlin Biennale.

Published by the Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art, 2019
With an essay by María Berríos
Graphic Design: Till Gathmann
Distributor: Vice Versa
16 × 24 cm, 44 pages, Softcover

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Special coloring book version available for download

Flávio de Carvalho: Experience no. 2, Performed on a Corpus Christi Procession. A Possible Theory and an Experiment

What kind of beast is a crowd? How does a pulsating collective body press against those within, outside, or underneath it? In what way are the powers of dissident bodies being incited today? These questions are at the core of Flávio de Carvalho’s experiment in publicly disregarding religious norms. What was Flávio de Carvalho looking for in 1931 on the streets of São Paulo when he decided to walk through the crowd of a Corpus Christi procession without removing his hat? This simple gesture generated outrage and violent reactions among the audience watching the procession—and almost led to the artist being lynched by an angry mob. Carvalho’s decision to flaunt his irreverence before a group of fervent followers was sparked by the artist’s deep interest in Sigmund Freud and mass psychology. Almost a century later, his account of his interactions with the crowd, Experiência no. 2realisada sobre uma procissão de Corpus Christi [Experience no. 2, Performed on a Corpus Christi Procession], speaks to the spread of fear and hate inherent to the rise of nationalism and fanaticism all over the world.

Published by the Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art, 2020
With an essay by Lisette Lagnado
Graphic Design: Till Gathmann
Distributor: Vice Versa
14.6 × 23 cm, 64 pages, softcover

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11. Berlin Biennale Link